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Breaking the Code

Breaking the Code is a 1996 TV adaptation of the play under the same name by Hugh Whitemore about British mathematician Alan Turing. The drama is directed by Herbert Wise and stars Derek Jacobi as Alan Turing, Alun Armstrong as Mick Ross, Blake Ritson as Christopher Morcom, and Richard Johnson as Dillwyn Knox. It is a biography of Alan Turing who was one of the inventors of the digital computer and one of the key figures in the breaking of the Enigma code, used by the Germans to send secret orders to their U-boats in World War II. Turing was also a practicing homosexual at a time when it was illegal in Britain.

Breaking the Code


Related Links
Alan Turing - wikipedia
Alan Mathison Turing (1912-1954) was an English mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst and computer scientist. He was highly influential in the development of computer science, giving a formalisation of the concepts of "algorithm" and "computation" with the Turing machine.
The Turing Digital Archive
This website contains nearly 3,000 images of letters, photographs, newspaper articles, and unpublished papers by or about Alan Turing. The images were scanned from the collection of Turing papers held in the Archive Centre at King's College, Cambridge.
The Strange Life and Death of Dr Turing
This film highlights the importance of Turing's early interest in logic and mathematics, as well as his later work during the Second World War at Bletchley Park where he was involved in breaking the code used by the German Enigma encryption machines.
Turing and von Neumann
Alan Turing (1912-1954) and John von Neumann (1903-1957) had an enormous range of interests not only in pure mathematics but also in practical applications.
Alan Turing: Legacy of a Code Breaker
From cryptanalysis and the cracking of the German Enigma Code during the Second World War to his work on artificial intelligence, Alan Turing was without doubt one of the greatest minds of the 20th century.
Turing: Pioneer of the Information Age
Jack Copeland looks at how many of Turing's ideas lie behind some of information technology's most fundamental theories.