infocobuild

Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) Extinction

The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event, formerly known as the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) extinction, was a mass extinction of some three-quarters of plant and animal species on Earth - including all non-avian dinosaurs - that occurred over a geologically short period of time 66 million years (Ma) ago. It marked the end of the Cretaceous period and with it, the entire Mesozoic Era, opening the Cenozoic Era which continues today.

It is generally believed that the K-Pg extinction was triggered by a massive comet/asteroid impact and its catastrophic effects on the global environment, including a lingering nuclear winter that made it impossible for plants and plankton to carry out photosynthesis. The impact hypothesis was bolstered by the discovery of the 180-kilometre-wide (112 mi) Chicxulub crater in the Gulf of Mexico in the late 1970s, which provided conclusive evidence that the K-Pg boundary clay represented debris from an asteroid impact. (from wikipedia.org)

Crater of Death
This film lays out what has been proved in the 20 years since the first appearance of evidence that an extraterrestrial impact was responsible for the death of the dinosaurs.

Catastrophe - Asteroid Strike
This program explores the trail of clues that lead to what extinguished the dinosaurs 65 million years ago and ultimately led to the evolution of humans.

Animal Armageddon - Doomsday
65 million years ago. An asteroid the size of Mount Everest is about to end the age of the dinosaurs, followed by powerful earthquakes, megatsunamis, and a lethal rain of flaming rocky debris during the first 24 hours.

Animal Armageddon - Panic in the Sky
65 million years ago. Wildfires, acid rain, earthquakes, global darkness, and snow storms spell death for the dinosaurs during their last year.

Last Day of the Dinosaurs
This is a Discovery Channel documentary about the extinction of the dinosaurs. It proposes a chronology of the Chicxulub impact and its effect on the dinosaurs and other animals around the world.

What Really Killed the Dinosaurs?
They uncovered a series of geological clues which suggests the truth may be far more complicated. In short, that the crater in the Yucatan is too old to have killed off the dinosaurs.


Related Links
Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event
It is generally believed that the K-Pg extinction was triggered by a massive comet/asteroid impact and its catastrophic effects on the global environment.
The Permian Mass Extinction
A collection of web documents, films and lectures that help us better-understand about the Permian-Triassic extinction event, the Great Dying, 250 million years ago.