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Fermat's Last Theorem

In number theory, Fermat's Last Theorem states that no three positive integers a, b, and c can satisfy the equationan an + bn = cn for any integer value of n greater than two. This theorem was first conjectured by Pierre de Fermat in 1637, famously in the margin of a copy of Arithmetica where he claimed he had a proof that was too large to fit in the margin. No successful proof was published until 1995 despite the efforts of countless mathematicians during the 358 intervening years. The unsolved problem stimulated the development of algebraic number theory in the 19th century and the proof of the modularity theorem in the 20th. It is among the most famous theorems in the history of mathematics and prior to its 1995 proof was in the Guinness Book of World Records for "most difficult math problems". (from wikipedia.org)

Fermat's Last Theorem

A story about a mathematician, Andrew Wiles, who struggled to prove the Fermat's Last Theorem and at last succeeded in proving it.


Related Links
Fermat's Last Theorem - wikipedia
In number theory, Fermat's Last Theorem states that no three positive integers a, b, and c can satisfy the equationan an + bn = cn for any integer value of n greater than two.
Three lectures on Fermat's last theorem
Author: L. J. Mordell. Subject: Fermat's Theorem. Publisher: Cambridge at the University Press, 1921. Book from the collections of: University of Michigan.
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This explains all the fundamentals of number theory exploring the many different types of numbers: natural numbers, prime numbers, integers, irrational numbers, algebraic numbers, imaginary numbers, transcendental numbers.
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The seventeenth century mathematician Pierre de Fermat is mainly remembered for contributions to number theory even though he often stated his results without proof and published very little.
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This episode focuses on the development of mathematical ideas in Europe, especially around the 16th - 19th centuries.