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Lost Kingdoms of Africa

Lost Kingdoms of Africa is a four-part BBC documentary series presented by Gus Casely-Hayford, exploring the pre-colonial history of some of Africa's most important kingdoms. In the series, Casely-Hayford travels to many historical sites across Africa and reveals the continent's forgotten civilizations, with the help of local guides and historians. He visits the spectacular monuments of Nubia, traces Ethiopia's heritage back in time, explores the places where gold and precious goods were traded in the kingdom of Great Zimbabwe, and explores the story of 16th-century bronzes from the kingdom of Benin.

Episode 1 - Nubia
This episode looks at Nubia, in what is now northern Sudan, a kingdom that dominated a vast area of the eastern Sahara for thousands of years.

Episode 2 - Ethiopia
This episode is about the kingdom of Ethiopia, which origins had links to king Solomon and the Queen of Sheba.

Episode 3 - Great Zimbabwe
In this episode, Casely-Hayford explores historical sites of the kingdom of Great Zimbabwe, especially the places where gold and precious goods were traded.

Episode 4 - West Africa
This episode is about the lost kingdoms of West Africa. Casely-Hayford explores the story of 16th-century bronzes from the kingdom of Benin.


Related Links
History of Africa - wikipedia
The history of Africa begins with the prehistory of Africa and the emergence of Homo sapiens in East Africa, continuing into the present as a patchwork of diverse and politically developing nation states.
Lost Kingdoms of Africa 2
This is a BBC documentary series presented by art historian Gus Casely-Hayford, exploring the history of some of Africa's kingdoms: the Kingdom of Asante, the Zulu Kingdom, the Berber Kingdom of Morocco and the Kingdoms of Bunyoro and Buganda.
Africa: The Story of a Continent
Africa: The Story of a Continent is a documentary series hosted by Basil Davidson, describing the history of Africa.
Hidden Treasures of African Art
In a revelatory journey which ends in Accra, the capital of Ghana, Griff learns that the passage of history and modern realities have had a surprising influence on invention and creativity in contemporary West Africa.