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Classical Mechanics

Classical Mechanics (Fall 2007, Stanford Univ.). Instructor: Professor Leonard Susskind. Our exploration of the theoretical underpinnings of modern physics begins with classical mechanics, the mathematical physics worked out by Isaac Newton (1642-1727) and later by Joseph Lagrange (1736-1813) and William Rowan Hamilton (1805-1865). We will start with a discussion of the allowable laws of physics and then delve into Newtonian mechanics. We then study three formulations of classical mechanics respectively by Lagrange, Hamiltonian and Poisson. Throughout the lectures we will focus on the relation between symmetries and conservation laws. (from theoreticalminimum.com)

Lecture 1 - State diagrams and the nature of physical laws
A general discussion of the nature of the laws of physics and in particular classical mechanics.
Lecture 2 - Newton's laws, principle of least action
Force and acceleration, Newton's laws, Kinetic energy and potential energy, Principle of least action.
Lecture 3 - Euler-Lagrange equations, symmetry and conservation laws
Euler-Lagrange equations, Canonical momentum, Momentum conservation, Symmetry and conservation laws.
Lecture 4 - Symmetry and conservation laws
This lecture focuses on the relation between continuous symmetries of the Lagrangian and conserved quantities.
Lecture 5 - Lagrangians and Hamiltonians
Simple pendulum, Hamiltonian, kinetic and potential energy, Double pendulum, Hamiltonian formulation.
Lecture 6 - Hamilton's equations
Energy conservation, Phase space, Canonical momentum, Poisson bracket, Hamilton's equations.
Lecture 7 - Liouville's theorem
Liouville's theorem, Phase space, Magnetic field, Incompressible flow in phase space.
Lecture 8 - Motion in an electromagnetic field
Least Action, Lorentz force equation, Electromagnetic equation of motion, Vector potential, Symmetries and conservation laws, Poisson brackets.
Lecture 9 - Poisson brackets formulation
Poisson brackets, Canonical transformation, Phase space, Generator function.

References
Classical Mechanics (Fall, 2007) | The Theoretical Minimum
Our exploration of the theoretical underpinnings of modern physics begins with classical mechanics, the mathematical physics worked out by Isaac Newton (1642 - 1727).
Classical Mechanics Lecture Notes
Classical Mechanics. Professor Leonard Susskind. The subject of this course is the relationship between symmetry and conservation laws.


The Theoretical Minimum Courses
Classical Mechanics (Fall 2007)
Classical Mechanics (Fall 2011)
Quantum Mechanics (Winter 2008)
Quantum Mechanics (Winter 2012)
Advanced Quantum Mechanics (Fall 2013)
Special Relativity (Spring 2008)
Special Relativity (Spring 2012)
Einstein's General Theory of Relativity (Fall 2008)
General Relativity (Fall 2012)
Cosmology (Winter 2009)
Cosmology (Winter 2013)
Statistical Mechanics (Spring 2009)
Statistical Mechanics (Spring 2013)
Particle Physics 1: Basic Concepts (Fall 2009)
Particle Physics 2: Standard Model (Spring 2010)
Particle Physics 3: Supersymmetry and Grand Unification (Spring 2010)
String Theory and M-Theory (Fall 2010)
Topics in String Theory (Cosmology and Black Holes) (Winter 2011)
Quantum Entanglements, Part 1 (Fall 2006)
Relativity (Spring 2007)